Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull, Lakota Medicine Man and Chief was considered the last Sioux to surrender to the U.S. Government. Sitting Bull was born in a tipi located near the Grand River near the Standing Rock Indian Reservationn in Dakota Territory. He was named Slon-He at birth, translated as “Slow” in standard Lakota language. In traditional Lakota fashion, he was given one of his father’s names, T?at?a?ka Iyot?a?ka, translated as “Sitting Bull”, due to a leadership role in a battle between the Lakota and Crow people. His father, Jumping Bull, was killed by Crow warriors around 1859 while moving his village. The event occurred when he was 14 years old, and led a charge and struck before the opposing Crow forces could, resulting in victory for the Lakota people without any fatalities.
In the Dakota War of 1862, several bands of the Sioux killed 600 settlers and soldiers in south-central Minnesota in response to poor treatment by the government and in an effort to drive the whites away. Despite being embroiled in the American Civil War, the United States Army retaliated in 1863 and 1864, even against bands which had not been involved in the hostilities. In 1864, two brigades of about 2200 soldiers under Brigadier General Alfred Sully attacked a village.
The defenders were led by Sitting Bull, Gall and Inkpaduta. The Sioux were driven out, but skirmishing continued into August.
In September, Sitting Bull and about 100 Hunkpapa Sioux came across a small party near what is now Marmarth, North Dakota. They had been left behind by a wagon train commanded by Captain James L. Fisk to effect some repairs to an overturned wagon. When he led an attack, Sitting Bull was shot in the left hip by a soldier. Fortunately for him, the bullet exited out through the small of his back, and the wound was not too serious.
Sitting bull was about war and the sooiux. The great soiux war of 1876 to 1877 was a big war. Sitting Bull’s band of Hunkpapas continued to attack migrating parties and forts.