Of Mice And Men

Of Mice and Men

In John Steinbeck’s, Of Mice and Men he tells about two completely different men, George and Lennie. George is small and witty, while Lennie on the other hand is large and rather slow. Beyond the differences, the two men share a bond and friendship like no other. George and Lennie are both working towards the same dream of success while everyone doubts this abberant pair. The two men learn more about the people around them, each other, and themselves. Along the way, both men share the same issues and obstacles – feeling isolated and lonely. Throughout the story, George guides Lennie through simple everyday tasks but when George goes out of town Lennie’s inability to control himself causes him to kill Curley’s wife. Feeling as if George had no alternative, he kills Lennie. This was the right thing for George to do.
George was the closest person to Lennie and understood that Lennie’s action was not deliberate. “We ain’t lonely George. An’ why? Because… because I got you to look after me, and you got me to look after you, and that’s why” (14). George was the closest thing to family Lennie ever had. “I ought to of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn’t ought to let no stranger shoot my dog” (61). If George did not kill Lennie, Carlson or Curley might have and that just wouldn’t have been right. Carlson and Curley would have killed Lennie out of hate and revenge, when Lennie did not kill Curley’s wife intentionally. Lennie is not aware of his own strength, and although he tries to be gentle and friendly – his actions always result in chaos and destruction. George was the best candidate to put Lennie out of his misery.

Dying right then and there was the better off solution for Lennie because he does not have the ability to live on his own. If George did not kill Lennie, and Lennie lived; he would have been kicked off the ranch, or he would have gone to jail. Lennie would have been tortured and tormented in prision and his chid-like ways make.