Nuclear Power Plants

Nuclear plants are extremely dangerous. Yes, there are some positives, but let’s first talk about the disadvantages.
The disadvantages of nuclear power include: the storage and management of dangerous high level radioactive waste; the possibility of proliferation of nuclear materials and potential terrorist applications; the high cost of building nuclear facilities and the small possibility of accidents.
For example, the earthquake and tsunami in Japan earlier this year caused a radiation leakage from a nuclear power plant in Fukushima, which affected the lives of many and caused people to evacuate. If this were to happen in Kakadu, it would be extremely deadly for the rest of Australia as well so we’ll have to consider that it is very dangerous.
Building a nuclear power plant in Kakadu could also endanger the species living in Kakadu National Park. Being known for its over 20000 of exceptional beauty and unique biodiversity, Kakadu is home to a lot of endangered species. In addition to the flora and fauna of Kakadu, the Aboriginal rock art sites and other landforms would also be in danger.
We also have to think about ourselves. Having a nuclear power plant so close to the people of our town is a very big risk. As you know, nuclear power generates radiation, which can be very fatal to humans. The health of the humans living alongside the nuclear power plant is in danger, because it is very hazardous for them to be exposed to high levels of radiation. The effects of the radiation leakage in Fukushima are a reminder that nuclear power plants, however helpful and positive, still poses a danger.
Incidents such as Chernobyl or Three Mile Island serve as reminders of how dangerous nuclear power plants can be. Both of these accidents occurred because of a core meltdown. In the case of a core meltdown, the flowing cooling water to the reactor stops and core overheats. When the core overheats, the products inside may flow out of the bulding and contaminate the.