Energy Crises in Pakistan

ENERGY CRISIS IN PAKISTAN AND NEED FOR ALTERNATE RESOURCES
Nuclear
Advantages
Australia 1,074,000-30%
Kazakhstan 622,000-17%
Canada 439,000-12%
South Africa 298,000-8%
Namibia 213,000-6%
Brazil 143,000-4%
Russian Fed. 158,000-4%
USA 102,000-3%
Uzbekistan 93,000-3%
World total 3,537,000
Source: Uranium Information Center, 9/05
Disadvantages
Outlook
Hydro
Advantages
Disadvantages
Outlook
Wind
Top Nine Suppliers of Wind Turbine Equipment
Company-Country-Market Share
Vestas-Denmark-34.1%
Gamesa-Spain-18.1%
Enercon-Germany-15.8%
GE Wind – a division of General Electric U.S.A. 11.3%
Siemens-Germany-6.2%
Suzlon-India-3.9%
Repower-Germany-2.8%
Mitsubishi-Japan-2.6%
Ecotecnia-Spain-2.6%
Nordex-Germany-2.3%
Source: www.Earthscan.co.uk, 8/18/05
Advantages
¦ It is a clean, renewable energy source.
to an electricity grid system.
Disadvantages
Outlook
Solar
Advantages
¦ The process used to generate solar energy is emission-free.
Disadvantages
Outlook
and Japan for these types of companies.
Hydrogen
Ways to Generate Hydrogen
Source: Congressional Energy Report, 2004
Electricity Generation
Transportation
¦ The high cost of fuel cells themselves.
Biomass
Biomass Electricity Generation
Biomass as a Substitute Fuel Source
Outlook
Pakistan is presently facing a serious energy crisis. Despite strong economic growth during the past decade and consequent rising demand for energy, no worthwhile steps have been taken to install new capacity for generation of the required energy sources. Now, the demand exceeds supply and hence “load-shedding” is a common phenomenon through frequent power shutdowns. Pakistan needs about 14000-15000MW electricity per day, and the demand is likely to rise to approximately 20,000 MW per day by 2010. Presently, it can produce about 11, 500 MW per day and thus there is a shortfall of about.