Drones

Cameron Henry English Discursive Essay
‘Should Unmanned Aerial Vehicles – drones – be used to strike possible terrorist targets?’
Imagine you were at a gathering with your friends and family celebrating the marriage between a close relative, then, out of nowhere missiles start hitting around you, and in the blink of an eye the relatives you had been having a great time with ten seconds earlier have been killed or heavily wounded.[1] The United States of America’s counter-terrorism program has caused some debate in the past, but the case which has acquired the most publicity is the United States’ use of drones in the Middle East. It is currently a vast topic of discussion which has caused controversy and raised many questions across the world. President Obama himself has ordered more than 350 strikes against al-Qaeda and their allied groups in Pakistan. [2] A drone is an Unmanned Ariel Vehicle is an aircraft which does not have a pilot on board and is controlled by the remote control of a pilot on the ground or autonomously by computers inside the vehicle. Drones are mainly used for military surveillance, but recently have been turned into unmanned weapons, with the ability to carry missiles and a tracking system. Many countries have their number and types of drones as secret military information so that it is not accessible by the public, including how many drones they have on hand, and what type of drone it is. Drones are mainly split into six categories depending on what job they carry out: Target and decoy, Reconnaissance, Combat, Logistics, Research and Development, and Civil and Commercial. Unlike most other countries, the United States has openly admitted to owning at least 678 drones– as of 2012 – [2] This has grasped the attention of many people with opposing opinions on the matter, should drones be used, or should on the ground troops be used?
Primarily and most importantly is the dispute around the accuracy and guarantee which surrounds the use of.