Canada After Ww2

Canada after WW2

The 1950’s
Political Changes in Canada:
Uncle Louis Government: After Mackenzie King resigned as the liberal prime minister in 1948 Louis St.Laurent was Kings Successor. He ran a very businesslike government he managed to boost the Canadian economy by increasing investment spending and spending during slow periods and controlling government spending when the economy was doing well. Uncle Louis was able to bring Newfoundland into confederation in 1949. He also created the St.Lawrence seaway which was huge for Canada’s imports and exports. Unemployment levels stayed low during Louis time as P.M.
Diefenbaker: in 1957 the Conservative party won a minority government over the liberals. Dief cut taxed for Canadians in 1 year as P.M. He helps farmers in the west, raised seniors pensions by $15. In 1958 Dief’s excellent public speaking won him the largest majority government in Canadian history. In 1960 he passed the Bill of Rights. He promoted the north by building roads. He helped western farmers sell large amounts of wheat to China and the Soviet Union. He scrapped the Avro Aero project, and did not allow warheads into Canada.
Demographic Changes in Canada:
Post-War Immigration: Large amounts immigrants escaped their home countries because of difficult political and economic conditions. As the Canadian economy began to grow and prosper, more skilled people were needed. There were three required elements to immigrate to Canada; good health, moral character, and marketable skills. In 30 years 4.7 million immigrants were now citizens of Canada.
War Brides: War Brides married a ton of Canadian soldiers overseas during the war. These European women came from; Holland, Belgium, Britain, and France. Some of these War Brides could not handle the harsh Canadian winters, the isolation from their families back home, or the very different life and a small percentile moved back home most of the Brides stayed.
Baby Boom: The post-war Canada population.